en

Services

The UK's leading employers trust us to deliver fast, efficient talent solutions that are tailored to their exact requirements. Browse our range of bespoke services and resources.

Read more
Jobs

Let our industry specialists listen to your aspirations and present your story to the most esteemed organisations in the UK, as we collaborate to write the next chapter of your successful career.

See all jobs
Candidates

Together, we’ll map out career-defining, life-changing pathways to achieve your career ambitions. Browse our range of services, advice, and resources.

Learn more
Services

The UK's leading employers trust us to deliver fast, efficient talent solutions that are tailored to their exact requirements. Browse our range of bespoke services and resources.

Read more
About Robert Walters UK

Since our establishment in 1985, our belief remains the same: Building strong relationships with people is vital in a successful partnership.

Learn more

Work for us

Our people are the difference. Hear stories from our people to learn more about a career at Robert Walters UK

Learn more

How to maximise your interview

The first few moments of your interview can have a decisive impact on how well the rest of it goes. Here’s how to start strong – together with some cautionary tales of what not to do from real interviewers…

1. The interview starts immediately

The interview starts long before you shake hands and sit down around the table. You never know who you might bump into as you make your way to the interview – for all you know, your interviewer could be in the same coffee-bar queue as you. So make sure you project a friendly, confident, professional air from the moment you set off.

Doubtless you’ll have made sure you arrive early. Give yourself time to have a comfort break and make sure you’re hydrated. Make conversation with the receptionist, switch off your phone and take in your surroundings – you might notice something that will make a useful small-talk topic later. Don’t try and cram in any last-minute facts – you want to come across as calm and organised, not flustered and under-prepared. 

What not to do:

‘I once heard someone standing outside our building, smoking furiously and complaining loudly on their phone about the early start time of their meeting and wondering aloud why they were even there. When I got to my next interview, I realised to my dismay the noisy moaner was my next candidate! Not a great start…’  

2. Create a strong first impression

First impressions count, and non-verbal cues matter even more than verbal ones. So in those first few minutes, it’s all about smiling confidently, shaking hands firmly, making eye contact and generally looking as if you’re glad to be there and you want the job. In everything you do, project an attitude of energy, enthusiasm and interest. 

Clothes-wise, try to match your dress style to that of the company you’re meeting. You should be able to get a good idea of the company’s typical dress code through its website and social media output, especially any content about its working culture, and your recruiter can advise you too. You want to project some personality and charisma, but you also want to come across as a good fit, so if in doubt always err on the formal side.

What not to do:

‘One candidate I interviewed asked for a glass of water while they waited. It was icy-cold and they must have spilled it just before we met, so my first impression was a very damp, chilly handshake. So always hold your drink in your left hand!’ 

3. Be ready for the small talk

Getting the small talk right (or wrong) can have big consequences. It’s a way for people to build rapport and affinity, and start to generate that elusive, intangible quality of ‘chemistry’ that characterises all effective business relationships.

So as part of your interview preparation, it’s a good idea to think ahead to some likely topics that might come up, so as to help keep the conversation flowing smoothly. The key is to come up with topics where you have a shared interest, so that you’re able to both ask and answer credible questions.  

For example, if you see a picture of your interviewer’s family, perhaps you could ask about them – and be ready with a family anecdote of your own. Or if you’re a sports fan and you spot signs that your interviewer is too, perhaps you could ask a suitable question that you’ve also got an interesting answer to (‘Do you ever get to the matches?’ ‘So who’s going to win the Cup this year?’ etc).

Think, too, about topical themes. For example, has your potential employer been in the news recently? In each case, make sure you have an interesting thought of your own to contribute too.  

What not to do:

‘One candidate I interviewed recently asked me a non-stop string of questions about my family, the job, the company, things in the news – all sorts of things. But he didn’t really have much to say himself and he didn’t really wait to hear my answer before asking the next question, so he just came across as rather anxious and scattered.’

4. Be on message from the outset

Politicians coached in handling the media are always advised to have a maximum of three key messages to get across, which they should stick to and repeat throughout any interview.

The first few moments of your interview can have a decisive impact on how well the rest of it goes

 

Similarly, it’s a good idea to have two or three key points that you want to make about what you have to offer and what you’re looking for – for example, ‘I’m ready for the challenge of managing a team’, ‘I combine compliance experience with technical expertise’, ‘in my career, I’ve developed an extensive digital transformation skillset’.

These are the three key points that you want your interviewer to remember about you. So try and work them in naturally whenever you can, even in the first few minutes. It’s also important to have a ready answer for some of the most common questions that come up early on – such as ‘Tell me why you want this job’ and ‘What’s your understanding of what this job involves?’

What not to do:

‘I always start by asking people to explain what our business does. This deceptively simple question floors lots of people – it’s amazing how many people struggle with it, perhaps because they’re attending several interviews in a row and haven’t made the time to do much research. But if you don’t come across as having a firm grasp of the company and why it’s hiring, the interviewer can only conclude that you’re not really that bothered about the job.’ 

5. First impressions count

Survey after survey highlights the importance of getting the first few seconds and minutes of your job interview right…

  • 6 in ten managers say an interviewee’s dress sense has a big impact on their employability (source: monster.co.uk survey)
  • 33 per cent of bosses say they know within 90 seconds whether they will hire someone (source: Classes and Careers)
  • It can take someone about a 1/10 of a second to form an impression of your trustworthiness – and that impression rarely changes later (source: Psychological Science)
  • Looking your interlocutor in the eye can help to raise their perception of your intelligence (source: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin)
  • More conservative colours such as blue and black are a safer bet in interviews, according to one survey of over 2000 hiring professionals. Orange is the worst! (source: CareerBuilder)

For more information on preparing for an interview see seven killer interview questions you can prepare for. 

Share this article

Useful links

Sign up for job alerts
Salary Survey
Career Advice
Get in touch

Find out more by contacting one of our specialist recruitment consultants

Related content

View all

6 interview questions to avoid asking

During an interview, although the company are assessing whether you will be a good fit for the team, you are also making sure the company and role will suit you and your lifestyle. To gain as much as you need to during your interview, it’s important to have a back pocket of interview questions for y

Read More

Why making a good interview impression is so important

Interviews can be nerve-wracking even without any unforeseen hiccups such as getting stuck in traffic or spilling coffee on your brand new suit. These can easily throw you off your A-game, causing you to lose concentration and give a bad first impression to your new potential employer. First impress

Read More

Tackling interview questions that reveal your character

There is lots of advice on how to answer interview questions about your experience, but it is also important to remember that there are some questions posed within an interview that while seeming more informal are important not to overlook. By thinking about answering hidden questions in advance, yo

Read More

I'm Robert Walters Are you?

Come join our global team of creative thinkers, problem solvers and game changers. We offer accelerated career progression, a dynamic culture and expert training.